Kari Lemor – St Johns County Writer

Kari Lemor has always been a voracious reader. One of those kids who had the book under the covers or under the desk at school. Even now she has been known to stay up until the wee hours finishing a good book. She lives with her husband and they split their time between a small town in New England and beautiful St. Augustine. Being near the ocean is her dream location.

Brief Bio

Award-winning author, Kari Lemor writes small-town contemporary romance and light romantic suspense. Her books focus on the characters and the challenges they face. She loves writing stories of people fighting against the odds, facing conflict, and finding a way to be together, despite their problems, and reach their Happily Ever After.

Contact the Writer

Email for Fans: karilemorauthor@gmail.com
Website for Fans: https://www.karilemor.com
Facebook Public Author Page: https://www.facebook.com/Karilemorauthor/
Twitter Writer Account: https://twitter.com/karilemor
Instagram Writers Page: https://www.instagram.com/karilemorauthor/
Amazon Author Profile Page: https://www.amazon.com/Kari-Lemor/e/B00ON2YDI6

Books Published

Love on the Line Series
Wild Card Undercover (book 1)
Running Target (book 2)
Fatal Evidence (book 3)

Newest Book in the Series Published August 10, 2020 (Book 4)

Storms of New England Series
Elusive Dreams (book 1)
True Dreams (book 2)
Stolen Dreams (book 3)

Beautiful Disaster Anthology
Worst Holiday Ever Anthology
A Witch by Chance: A Written Fireside Short Story
I looked Away: Fireside Short Story
Unstable Ground – Free on her website

Interview Q/A by Kari Lemor

Do you want each book to stand on its own, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book?

I write books that are stand alones, meaning they can be read in any order and the story is still intact. But my books are all part of the series. My first series, Love on the Line, is a romantic suspense series where the heroes of each book all served in the military together. Each book is about a different couple with their own conflicts and challenges. But we see them connect with friends from their unit as they go through their journey.

My second series, Storms of New England, is a small-town contemporary series about the Storm family who hails from…you guessed it, New England. Again, each book can be read by itself and focuses on a different couple, but the other relatives are interwoven throughout each story. As I continue the series, we will see characters from previous stories get married, have children, and move forward with their lives. They’ll be behind the scenes supporting the new main characters, but we’ll know their Happily Ever After is still continuing strong.

How did publishing your first book change your process of writing?

When I first started writing, I was what they call a pantser. I would just sit and write whatever came to mind. Sure, I had ideas for characters and the main plot, but mostly I just winged it as I wrote. When it came time to send it out to publishers, I knew there were tons of plot holes and things that didn’t make sense. It took me quite a while to go back and revise and fix all the problems so the book flowed right and made sense. Unfortunately, I had already written the second book as well. That one had more plot holes than the first.

When thinking about the third book, I realized I needed to really make sure I didn’t dig myself into another hole that I’d have to find a way to climb out of. So I did lots more character development and planning story arcs and conflicts. I still didn’t plan every single event or scene, but I knew where the characters were starting and where they needed to go, and some of the hurdles they needed to face during the journey. So now, while still not being a complete Plotter, I do make sure I have the basics secured and in place before I allow the characters to take over and lead me to the end of their story.

If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?

This question is easy. I would tell my younger self to start writing earlier. I never liked writing as a child, mostly because I was always told what to write. Analyze this, compare and contrast that. No one ever told me to create a world and put people in it who have struggles and conflicts to deal with. But though I never put words on paper, I always had story ideas running through my head. Usually, as I was trying to fall asleep each night. It wasn’t until my children were in their teens that I finally started putting words on paper. I wonder where I could be right now if I had started doing that much younger.

What was your hardest scene to write?

One of the hardest scenes I’ve ever written is in the book Elusive Dreams. The scene itself flowed easily onto the page, however, the scene had me bawling my eyes out at the emotion it evoked. Tessa Porter was a child who went through the foster care system. At the age of four, she was abandoned in a hospital waiting room. She doesn’t really remember it much until a trip to the hospital and sitting in the emergency room triggers a memory. Part of this scene is from the mind of a four-year-old child. Being in that child’s mind as she sits there waiting for her mother to come back and get her is excruciating. I just had a reader tell me they couldn’t stop crying when they read that scene. Even after rereading the book many times for edits, I still have a hard time getting through that part.

Interview with Kari Lemor

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jolenemac66

I am a retired medical office worker who sold everything, bought an old RV and began traveling around the state of Florida with her mother and youngest daughter. We have settled down in the Lake City, Florida area for now as I am writing another book and have began taking on website design and social media content creator clients.

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